Depart From Us

Job 21:14-15

They say to God, ‘Depart from us!

We do not desire the knowledge of your ways.

What is the Almighty, that we should serve him?

And what profit do we get if we pray to him?’

The verses above are from the Book of Job, and if you read the Book of Job you’ll know that these verses are part of a back and forth conversation between Job and his three friend.  Later I’ll have some more posts about the entire story of Job.  Each time I read the story I discover a deeper meaning, but for now I just want to focus on these two verses.

Job’s one friend, Bildad, has told Job he must have done something very wicked and evil.  Why else would these horrible, catastrophic things have happened to Job?  Job’s rebuttal is the wicked may not always be punished, at least not during their time on earth.  Now in a later post I’ll get more into this facet of the story of Job as well, since this is the basic theme of conversation between Job and his three friends.

Verses 14 and 15 of Job Chapter 21 are part of Job’s detailed answer. (Read all of chapter 21 to learn his full answer.)  Job talks about the wicked people that you see and know.  They become powerful.  They live in homes safe from fear.  They prosper, their children are happy and they party all the time.

Because they have found such success and prosperity in worldly things they fall into the trappings of the successful and powerful. These people become their own god and no longer have a place in their hearts for God.  Their hearts are filled with themselves.

And they say, why should I serve God, what’s in it for me?  They have become vain and there lies the pitfall of success and power.

So we have done today, with all the knowledge and sophistication man has gained through the centuries.  We have gained luxuries and prosperity and we say as individuals and people:

… ‘Depart from us!

We do not desire the knowledge of your ways.

What is the Almighty, that we should serve him?

And what profit do we get if we pray to him?’

© Otis P Smith and About the Groove, 2018. Unauthorized use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to Otis P Smith and About the Groove with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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